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Commonly used forms for landlords: N1, N4, N11, N12, N13, L1, L2

landlord forms
 
 

Some of the more frequently used paperwork landlords come across are notices and applications. An example of this would be notices of rent increase and notices of termination (aka eviction notices). Applications include applications to the Landlord and Tenant Board to end tenancies.

Below is a guide on some of the more common notices and applications. First, we will run through notices (N1, N4, N11, N12 and N13) followed by applications (L1 and L2).

 

Here’s a quick rundown on each form:

N1: This form is given to a tenant when a landlord is increasing their rent. Most landlords use the N1 form when increasing a tenant’s rent.

N4: A notice to end an early tenancy for non-payment of rent.

N11: A mutual agreement between the landlord and the tenant to end the tenancy.

N12: A notice to end the tenancy because the landlord, a purchaser, or a family

member will be moving into the unit.

N13: A notice ending a tenancy because the landlord wants to demolish, repair, or convert the rental unit for another use.

L1: An application to evict a tenant because they didn’t pay the rent and to collect the money that is owed.


L2: An application to end a tenancy and evict a tenant or collect money.


For more details on each of these forms, keep reading. 

 

 

NOTICES

N1: Notice of Rent Increase

When to use this notice:

The N1 form is given to a tenant when a landlord is increasing their rent. 

  • You must wait for 12 months to pass since the last rent increase before increasing the rent again

  • Before increasing the rent, you must give the tenant 90 days notice

  • You can read more about the rental increase process here.

     

When filling out the form:

  • You must stipulate in dollars and cents the amount of the rental increase, the percentage of increase this represents and how often rent needs to be paid (e.g. weekly, monthly). 

  • There is a rent increase guideline set every year by Ontario. You can read about it here. If you are increasing the rent above the guideline you need to disclose this on the form and whether or not it has been approved by the Landlord and Tenant Board.

  • If the landlord has applied to increase the rent above the yearly guideline and it has yet to be approved, the tenant can either pay:

    • the amount the landlord is seeking to have approved, or

    • their current rent plus the amount outlined in the current year’s guideline (1.2% for 2022)

       

N4: Notice to End your Tenancy Early for Non-payment of Rent


When to use this notice:

Landlords can use this form when a tenant has not paid their rent on time. The earliest you can file the notice is one day after the missed payment. The tenant must still be living in the unit in order to use this notice.

When filling out the form:

When a landlord fills in the N4 form, there is a section that asks for a termination date. If the landlord's agreement with the tenant is based on monthly, bi-weekly or yearly payments,  the termination date needs to be set to at least 14 days after you give the tenant notice. 

For rental payments made every day or weekly, the termination date should be 7 days after you give the tenant notice. (The day you give the notice to the tenant does not count in the 7 or 14 days).

The termination date is important because if the tenant pays their rent by the termination date, the N4 form is void. 

 

L1 form:

If the tenant doesn’t pay the rent in time and also doesn’t move out by the termination date, the landlord can apply to the Landlord and Tenant board to evict the tenant and also collect the rent that is owed using an L1 form. This can be done the day after the termination date marked in the N4. In addition to the L1, the landlord will need a copy of the N4 form they submitted to the tenant as well as a Certificate of Service, which outlines how and when  the notice was provided. You can read more about the L1 form below.

General rules submitting the notice forms:

The filled in notice form serves as a written notice and it can be delivered by either handing it to the tenant or an adult in the unit, putting it in their mailbox, mail slot, or under their front door, via fax, courier, or mail. Sending notices via email or text is not considered proper notice.



APPLICATION FORMS

Just because a landlord has submitted a notice of eviction to a tenant, it doesn’t mean the tenant has to move out. The landlord also needs to file an application with The Landlord and Tenant Board and from there (if the board accepts the application) this will bring about a hearing, allowing the tenant a chance to defend their tenancy. 

 

N11: Agreement to End the Tenancy

When to use this form:

An N11 form is used when both the tenant(s) and the landlord(s) are agreeing to end the tenancy. Here are a few scenarios that apply:

  • When the landlord and tenant want to break the lease before it expires

  • The landlord/tenant relationship has grown hostile

  • You do not have to have a reason to file an N11  

     

A few things to note:

A tenant cannot be forced to sign an N11 form and, if they sign the form on the same day they sign their lease, the N11 is considered void.

That aside, there are a couple of circumstances under which the landlord can have the tenant sign the N11 as a condition of their lease:

1- When it involves on campus housing for students, or school has made an agreement with the landlord to house a student

2- Certain conditions apply when a person is renting a unit in a care home

3- The unit is being provided to the tenant as part of a rental agreement between the landlord and the building’s service manager (superintendent). 

You cannot have someone sign this form because you sold your house and are moving out. A new owner also cannot use an N11 as a way to have a tenant move out. 

If the tenant vacates the premises by the move out date, the landlord can’t go after the tenant for rent they didn’t pay. 

 

When filling out the form:

  • The form has an intended move out date outlined. If a tenant does not move out by then,  the form is considered void.

  • There is a blank space on the form, do not fill it in with notes, or it might raise questions about the case with the Landlord and Tenant Board

 

 

N12: Notice to End your Tenancy Because the Landlord, a Purchaser or a Family Member Requires the Rental Unit

When to use this form?

N12 forms are for evicting a tenant for one of two reasons:

1- The landlord, a member of their immediate family or someone who provides care to either them or their immediate family is going to move into the unit for a year or more

2- Someone has purchased the landlord’s house and either the purchaser, their immediate family, or someone who cares for their immediate family will be moving into the unit and the complex has three or fewer units.  

Rules:

  • If a caregiver is moving in to take care of the landlord or their family, the person they are taking care of must live in the same building.

  • The tenant who is being asked to vacate the premises must be paid one month’s rent or be offered another unit that they find acceptable. If the landlord is paying the tenant compensation, it must be given to them before or on the termination date (written in the notice).

  • The N12 form includes a termination date. You must give the tenant 60 days notice from the day they receive the N12 form.  

L2 form:

The next step is to file an L2 form. This is an application to end a tenancy and evict a tenant. You can read more about the L2 form below, under applications. 

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N13: Notice to End your Tenancy Because the Landlord Wants to Demolish the Rental Unit, Repair it or Convert it to Another Use


When to use this form:


There are three circumstances to use an N13 form to evict a tenant:


1- The landlord is going to demolish the building or unit

2- In order to do extensive renovations, the unit needs to be vacant

3- The landlord is going to convert the unit or building into something that is for non-residential use

Rules:

If the tenant is being evicted because the landlord needs the place to be vacant in order to do renovations, then the tenant has the option to move back in once the renovations are done. If they plan on moving back in, they need to let the landlord know in writing and also update the landlord in writing on any changes to their address. 

Under the termination date on the N13, tenants must be given 120 days notice  or it will not be considered valid. 

 

Compensation:

When an eviction is happening using an N13 form, tenants must be compensated.

Those who do not intend on moving back in must be compensated financially, or be given a new rental unit to live in (that is to their liking). The amount of compensation depends on the building they are being evicted from.

  • If the building has five units or more, you need to pay them three months’ rent

  • If the building has less than five units, you need to pay them one months’ rent

If the tenant is being evicted because the landlord is repairing or renovating the rental unit, and they have provided written notice that they plan to return once the work is done, the following rules for compensation apply:

  • Whichever is less of the following two options: If the unit has five units or more they must be given three months’ rent or an amount equal to the number of months it will take to be renovated e.g. if it is going to take two months to renovate the landlord pays two months’ rent

  • Whichever is less of the following two options: If the building has less than five units, they must be given one month’s  rent or an amount equal to the number of months it will take to be renovated

  • The tenant must be offered another rental unit that is to their liking

Tenants must be compensated either before or on the termination date. 

If the landlord is being ordered to do repairs or demolish the unit or building as a result of an Act, then they do not have to compensate the tenants. 

 

L2 form:

The next step is to file an L2 form. This is an application to end a tenancy and evict a tenant. You can read more about the L2 form below, under applications. 

 

 

L1: Application to evict a tenant for non-payment of rent and to collect rent the tenant owes

 

What is the L1 application for?

The purpose of the L1 is to evict the tenant, ending the tenancy and collect the money the tenant owes the landlord up until the date they move out.

  • If a landlord doesn’t want to evict a tenant and just wants to collect the money they are owed, they can use an L9 form. 

  •  If the tenant has already moved out, the landlord can’t file this application. To collect the money they are owed, they should use an L10 form.

     

To file the L1 application you will need submit:

  • The completed L1 application form

  • A copy of the N4 notice you gave your tenant

  • The Certificate of Service (a form stating when and how you gave the tenant the N4 notice) 

  • The application fee (you can include your payment information in the application)

 

 

L2: Application to End a Tenancy and Evict a Tenant or Collect Money

What is the L2 application for?

The L2 form can be used to evict a tenant and end the tenancy for any of the following reasons:

  • The landlord has given the tenant notice to end the tenancy using any of the following forms (except for the N4): N5, N6, N7, N8, N12, N13

  • The tenant abandoned the unit

  • The tenant was the superintendent and lived in the building. Their role as superintendent ended more than seven days before.

This form can also be used to ask the Landlord and Tenant Board to order a tenant to:

  • Pay the landlord rent for each day a tenant stays past the termination date in notice they were given to end the tenancy. 

  • Pay back the landlord for costs associated with non-sufficient fund cheques that were given to the landlord

  • Pay the landlord for unpaid utility costs owed

  • Compensate the landlord for damages to the rental unit or complex caused by the tenant or their guest(s) as well as expenses associated with the tenant and their guests being disruptive on the property (hindering other people’s ability to enjoy it).

  • Pay the difference if they are living in a Rent-Geared-to-Income unit and would have paid more had they been honest about their income

If the tenant is being evicted the L2 form must be filed no later than 30 days after the termination date written in the notice to end the tenancy.

If the tenant has already moved out the landlord can’t file this application. If the tenant moved out less than a year ago, an L10 can be filed by the landlord to collect money they are owed. 

To file the L2 application the landlord needs to submit:

  • The completed the L2 form

  • The application fee (you can include your payment information in the application)

     

If the L2 is being filed to evict the tenant the following also needs to be submitted:

  • A copy of the notice they gave their tenant ending the tenancy

  • A copy of The Certificate of Service (the form stating when and how you gave the tenant the notice to end their tenancy)

  • Any documents specific to their application 

 

To download the forms that have been outlined in this article, and for further details visit Tribunals Ontario.

Looking to raise the rent you charge in 2022? Learn about the 2022 rent increase guidelines in one of our recent blog posts.


The blog posts on this website are for the purpose of general introductory information. They can’t serve as an opinion or professional advice. Speak to a professional before making decisions related to your circumstances.

 

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